Historical Timeline of Snowchange

lumimyrsky_1998_4On this page, you can see the historical development of the Snowchange Cooperative into its current, global forum of Indigenous and local communities. Events and achievements from each year have been mentioned, but the chronology is not comprehensive. It will be updated.

pre2000

Prior to establishment of the Snowchange initiatives, various key people visited Sámi communities in 1996 in Utsjoki and Nuorgam region, as well as the Cree community of Moosonee on Hudson Bay, Canada in 1998. Additionally Professor Peter Such from University of York, Toronto, Canada shared many experiences from his work record with the Inuit people of Nunavut in 1970s. In 1999 the first ever visits to Lovozero, Kola Sámi ‘capital in the Russian Arctic was made and cooperation discussed.

Eagle in the Pacific, 2004.

Eagle in the Pacific, 2004.

2000

In 2000, University of Applied Sciences-Tampere in Finland initiated an international cooperation between Russia, Finland and Canada called ‘Northern Environment Student Forum’. This field -based and online environmental educational initiative partnered with the Indigenous Governance of the University of Victoria, University of Fraser Valley, both in British Columbia, Canada as well as the Murmansk Institute of Humanities and Murmansk State Technical University to study northern ecology and communities. In late 2000 the Finnish representatives met with Tahltan, Haida and Kwakwakwakwala First Nations representatives in BC to discuss a new style of a book on Indigenous issues and direct representation.

Old totem pole close to Alert Bay, Canada. Snowchange, 2004

Old totem pole close to Alert Bay, Canada. Snowchange, 2004

Visits were made to North Sámi areas, Murmansk, Russia, Haida Gwaii and Dease Lake, BC, Canada to prepare this initiative.

2001The year began with an online educational partnership between University of Applied Sciences-Tampere in Finland and Indigenous Governance of the University of Victoria, Canada. Field trips to Iceland and Murmansk were made.

In March 2001 Tero Mustonen participated in the Northern Climate Exchange that was held at the Yukon College, Whitehorse, Canada. Several new partnerships emerged from this meeting. Vice President of the Sámi Council Stefan Mikaelsson and Tero Mustonen decided to launch a “Sámi Climate Change” work later in the year as the reindeer herders were concerned about their observations of weather change.

Following the influential Yukon event, Finnish delegation continued on to the Northwest Territories and Alaska. Cooperation agreements on ‘Indigenous Observations of Climate Change’ Project emerged between the Inuvialuit Joint Secretariat, Gwitchin First Nations and Aurora Research Institute and Snowchange. Visits were made to Tuktoyaktuk, Fairbanks, Dawson City and Anchorage.

In June 2001 a new international partnership was established. The ’Indigenous Observations of Climate Change’ Project and the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment, which had just been launched, agreed to partner on the Indigenous observations.

11th September 2011, the first Snowchange book – Dispatches From the Cold Seas: Indigenous Views from British Columbia, was released. Later in September, the first community workshops and documentations on Sámi observations of climate change in Vuotso, Utsjoki and Murmansk region took place.

In November 2001, Jackie Price, Inuit lady from Nunavut visited University of Applied Science – Tampere and the first ‘Snowchange 2001′ Workshop was held.

20022002 was a year of dramatic events and community work. In February 2002 Snowchange was national news with the large Conference Snowchange 2002 held in Tampere, Finland with a large local and Indigenous participation across the Arctic and delegates from Africa. Between March and October 2002, community documentation of climate change took place in

  • Vuotso, Finland
  • Utsjoki, Finland
  • Murmansk region, Russia
  • Iceland
  • Nunavut, Canada
  • Inuvialuit, Canada
  • Yukon, Canada
  • British Columbia, Canada
  • Unalakleet, Alaska, USA

In October 2002 Snowchange won the biggest environmental prize of Finland – WWF Panda.

2003

Early 2003 Snowchange Conference was held in Murmansk and Lovozero, Murmansk Region, Russia with the Eastern Saami communities and science partners. Several Siberian Indigenous delegates arrived to the event from Nenets, Kamchatka, Khanty and other regions.

Snowchange has led community-based traditional knowledge work in many areas since 2000. Here a photo from the all-nation Press Conference, Murmansk, Russia, 2003. Photo: Snowchange, 2014

Snowchange has led community-based traditional knowledge work in many areas since 2000. Here a photo from the all-nation Press Conference, Murmansk, Russia, 2003. Photo: Snowchange, 2014

Between March and November 2003 the documentation of climate change work and oral histories was extended to

  • Alert Bay, BC, Canada
  • Faroe Islands
  • Greenland
  • Haida Gwaii, BC, Canada

While all of the existing work from 2000-2002 was kept and expanded. New Indigenous communities wanted to join the Snowchange network. In late 2003 more work was expanded to the South Pacific with the Samoans on climate change, and Hawaii. In Latin America and Nepal new community partnerships blossomed.

2004

2004 saw the end of the first four-five years of Indigenous and domestic work.

iceland harbour seals

iceland harbour seals

Three books were released:

  • Snowscapes, Dreamscapes: Snowchange Book on Community Voices of Change
  • Ahdin nuotta-apajilla (A Finnish book on Pirkanmaa Fishermen)
  • Pitkät hylkeenpyyntimatkat (Oral Histories of the Baltic Seal Hunters)

Additionally, the influential Arctic Climate Impact Assessment came out in November 2004. Snowchange work was expanded to Northern Iceland with the Broddanes and Akureyri seal hunters. Work began in Siberia with the Evenk, Chukchi and Yukaghir in the Republic of Sakha-Yakutia, Russia. Snowscapes, Dreamscapes was chosen ‘Book of the Year’ in Nunavut, Canada.

2005

Year of the independent Cooperative. The Snowchange research project ended. Immediately afterwards it was registered as a non-profit, independent Cooperative in Finland. The launch was in August 2005 with roughly 10 interested fishermen, researchers, youth and artists at the Olli Klemola’s traditional farm in Pälkäne, Finland. The international network would grow as well.

Chukchi nomadic Turvaurgin in reindeer separation, Winter 2005. Photo: Snowchange

Chukchi nomadic Turvaurgin in reindeer separation, Winter 2005. Photo: Snowchange

In the spring, a research and community monitoring effort got under way in Sakha-Yakutia. Both the Evenk areas and Lower Kolyma was the area of the oral history work with the Indigenous Peoples Institute and the nomadic communities. This partnership would continue intensively in 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012-2016.

In September 2005, together with the ICC, Indigenous organisations and the Northern Forum, Snowchange 2005 was held in Anchorage, Alaska, USA. The report Stories of the Raven was issued in December. Snowchange participated in the World Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan and formed lasting relations with the Maori Research Unit of NIWA from Aotearoa, NZ.

2006

2006 expanded the partnerships in Siberia, Murmansk and British Columbia. Most of the first half of 2006 was the work in Yakutia.

Kesälahti seiners

Kesälahti seiners

Domestically the North Karelian Oral History project began in the communities of Kesälahti, Ilomantsi and Kontiolahti. Grand Chief Steven Point and his wife Gwen visited in the Snowchange events and communities in Finland and Sámi areas.

 

 

2007

The year saw significant changes to Snowchange. Early in the year, the work in Yakutia was expanded to Tuora-Kel and other Sakha regions. In March the international Snowchange 2007 Conference was held in Neriungri and Iengra, Yakutia.

Oktjabrina Naumova, an Evenk knowledge holder from Iengra, Republic of Sakha-Yakutia, Russia was one of the main organisers of Snowchange 2007.

Oktjabrina Naumova, an Evenk knowledge holder from Iengra, Republic of Sakha-Yakutia, Russia was one of the main organisers of Snowchange 2007.

New partnerships were initiated in British Columbia with the Sto:lo First Nations. All international work continued. In Finland, the Snowchange HQ was re-located to the village of Selkie, North Karelia. The oral history work here was expanded especially to winter seiners. Sámi Council and Snowchange partnered to document traditional land uses and occupancies in Kola Peninsula due to the influx of domestic and international mining companies to the region.

 

 

 

 

2008In 2008 the Finnish government invited Snowchange to be the traditional knowledge coordinator for the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment. In March 2008 a significant global biodiversity event took place at the Museum of Natural History, New York, USA where Snowchange partnered with the Indigenous Peoples Climate Change Assessment.

Darren leads the Maori Research Unit of National Institute of Atmospheric and Water in Aoteaoroa. Snowchange, 2014

Darren leads the Maori Research Unit of National Institute of Atmospheric and Water in Aoteaoroa. Snowchange, 2014

Towards the end of the year, Snowchange 2008 was held in Taranaki, Aotearoa, NZ to celebrate the lifework of Mahinekura Reinfelds, a Maori knowledge holder. Community work was expanded and continued. The domestic members included close to 30 people in Snowchange HQ.

 

 

 

 

 

2009

In 2009 much of the year was spent on the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment work, the solar panel programme was expanded in Siberia and the Kola Sámi land use work continued.

Sosnovka from air. Snowchange, 2016

Sosnovka from air. Snowchange, 2016

Chukchi delegation visited Finland in April for cooperation talks. The Unalakleet book of oral histories was launched in March in Alaska, USA. A new connection with the Republic of Udmurtia, Russia was established on school cooperation.

 

 

 

2010

2010 the Vuotso Sámi book on the impacts of the reservoirs Lokka and Porttipahta rose to the national attention. Arctic Biodiversity Assessment work proceeded as well as other community-based monitoring across the Arctic.

Children of Nutendli, 2010. Photo: Nutendli nomadic community, 2014.

Children of Nutendli, 2010. Photo: Nutendli nomadic community, 2014.

In July 2010 the fish died, due to the acidic soils and peat production, in Selkie village, North Karelia, Finland. This was the thrust to launch the most progressive ecological restoration project nationally, the Jukajoki project, spanning now six years and 2,7 million euros.Professor Jules Pretty from the UK visited Puruvesi winter seiners. In Siberia, nomadic school work was funded. Georges and Miguel Sioui from the Wendat people visited Finland.

2011

2011 was the year of the Eastern Sámi Atlas. The book went on to win ‘Book of the Year’ awards in Finland and USA. Jukajoki restoration work got underway domestically. Snowchange was 10 years old as a network. Arctic Biodiversity Assessment work continued without any breaks.

Eastern Sámi family camp in Seitsul Island, Kola Peninsula, in late 1800s. Photo: Courtesy of the Snowchange Co-op, 2014

Eastern Sámi family camp in Seitsul Island, Kola Peninsula, in late 1800s. Photo: Courtesy of the Snowchange Co-op, 2014

In Siberia the solar panels were installed in nomadic camps and fishing sites. In September 2011 a large international UN related Conference Indigenous Peoples Climate Change Assessment was held in Sevettijärvi, Skolt Sámi area, Finland. This was the launch of the Näätämö and Ponoi Co-Management Projects to cope with climate change.

 

 

20122012 expanded many partnerships in the South Pacific. Sámi and Finns travelled to Cairns to a IPCC UN event on climate change and then visited extensively with the Mulong Corp and Victor Steffensen from the Traditional Knowledge Revitalisation Project.

On Kolyma, August 2012.

On Kolyma, August 2012.

In Siberia the panel work expanded and summer visits took place in August. Utsjoki Sámi book on the oral histories of Aslak Ola Aikio was launched. Linnunsuo wetland unit was finished on river Jukajoki, to become a national bird paradise. Theresa and Travis Neel from the Kwakwakwakwala First Nation visited Finland in the summer.

 

 

2013

2013 was the conclusion to the first round of work with the Swedish Sámi in Jokkmokk, Northern Sweden. The oral history book was released in October, 2013 preceded by several community workshops.

Sámi of Jokkmokk

Sámi of Jokkmokk

Domestically the Jukajoki restoration project stage 1 was finished.

New partnerships were established with the KI First Nations, Ontario, Canada, facilitated by the Wilderness Conservation Society of Canada. Näätämö Co-management Plan was released as a book. In May 2013 the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment, after six years of work, was finally released.

 

 

 

2014

Another year of changes. Due to geographical and focus-related issues, Snowchange domestic operations were split to Western and Eastern Finnish areas. All operations were concentrated to Selkie village, North Karelia, Finland. International programmes were at all time full capacity. The theme of ecological restoration using traditional knowledge emerged through the practical successes on the ground. The Steering Committee of the global work of Snowchange was established officially – members of the Steering Committee guide and steer the work we do and the community network.

Kolyma herding

Kolyma herding

New partnerships emerged with the Puruvesi winter seiners. Jukajoki project received new 200,000 euro restoration funds. Pretty Good Productions from USA formed a partnership with Snowchange which was to lead to the ‘Jukajoki’ feature film. In Näätämö and Siberia the work was expanded. Late in the year, a South Pacific tour included visits in Northern Queensland, World Parks Congress, Aotearoa and several Siberian sites. Work with the Khanty was strenghtened through visits and the Festival of Northern Fishing Traditions.

2015

Snowchange is 15 years old. The year saw visits to Italy to the World Expo, a speaking tour of the UK, and new cooperation with the fishermen of Latvia.

Work with the Khanty

Work with the Khanty

In the Arctic community monitoring was in full swing. Jukajoki restoration and Näätämö work was expanded to the community of lake Kuivasjärvi, Western Finland. Jukajoki won the prestigeous ‘Energy Globe Award’. Snowchange was invited to the high-level Climate Change: Risk Assessment report with the Obama administration, UK, India and China. This report was prominently featured on the Financial Times, BBC, Guardian and the Times.

2016

2016 began with international efforts. Snowchange travelled to Tehran, Iran in January to the global Energy Globe Awards gala – one of the first events after the lifting of the sanctions. In February we participated in the global Species on the Move Conference in Tasmania, visited Mulong in Queensland and forged new cooperation with the East Trinity Reserve, QLD, Australia.

Cassowary in QLD, Australia

Cassowary in QLD, Australia

Jukajoki film was released in March, 2016. It began to tour the world. Towards summer Sámi work on the Näätämö river, for its fifth year, expanded. In September the Siberians and Snowchange will gather, once again, for the Festival of Northern Fishing Traditions, Part 2. In May, the Life in the Cyclic World: Traditional Knowledge from Eurasian North, was released, to much international interest. In July we celebrated awareness of the climate and environmental as well as Indigenous issues with Neil Young, a Canadian rock musician who invited Snowchange to his Helsinki Concert. In August we released the ”Endemic World”, a book describing the culture and environmental situation on lake Kuivasjärvi and the Forest Finns there. September – October was spent on the road. In early September over 52 professional Indigenous fishermen collected together on the Lena River, Siberia for the second ”Festival of Northern Fishing Festival”, envisioned by Olli Klemola. In November Snowchange was invited to coordinate the Indigenous and local knowledge work for the Nordic IPBES report in 2017 and we also took part in the Low Impact Fishermen of Europe annual summit in Warsaw, Poland. Much awaited Arctic Resilience Report was launched 25th November, 2016, and gathered 100,000 shares on the Guardian webpages. December saw an extensive trip to Iceland and Greenland, to meet with seal hunters and the Inuits involved in the community-based monitoring and ILK work.

Lena river

Lena river

Snowchange, in the 17 years of its existence, has emerged as a very unique network of Indigenous and local traditional communities – we are completely independent, yet have been able to participate in the global discussions of climate change, biodiversity and Indigenous and traditional knowledge issues for almost 20 years. The work continues…