Snowchange Work in Canada

Kwakwakwala Canoe in BC, 2002.

Kwakwakwala Canoe in BC, 2002.

Cooperation with various Inuit and First Nations peoples in Canada has been a foundation for Snowchange since its inception. Below the work and partner relations are explained in brief 2000-2015 with each Nation and region.

Eagle in the Pacific, 2004.

Eagle in the Pacific, 2004.

Sto:lo First Nation, BC, Canada

Lieutnant-Governor of British Columbia, 2007-2012 Steven Point, Grand Chief of the Sto:lo

Lieutnant-Governor of British Columbia, 2007-2012 Steven Point, Grand Chief of the Sto:lo

Connections with the Sto:lo date back to 2000. However, main discussions on cooperation ensued around 2005. Between 2006-2010 Snowchange and the Sto:lo established a wide-ranging dialogue on co-management, documentation of traditional land use and occupancy which the Sto:lo had perfected, climate change issues and restoration of traditional knowledge in a community-led style. In 2006 the Grand Chief, later Lieutnant-Governor of British Columbia Steven Point and his wife Gwendolyn visited in Finland, both the in the boreal communities of Southern Finland as well as Ylläs and Rovaniemi in the Arctic. In 2007 Snowchange delegates investigated the ecological restoration work that had taken place on the Skowkale Reserve on salmon habitats. 2007-2010, and since the parties have visited, continued dialogue and partnerships as the occasion has allowed.

Indigenous Governance Programme, University of Victoria, Canada

Pacific Salmon is the life of the First Nations of the region. Snowchange, 2004

Pacific Salmon is the life of the First Nations of the region. Snowchange, 2004

This Indigenous-led educational initiative has worked with Snowchange since 2000. The cooperation especially between 2000-2005 has spanned seminars, field visits, online educational courses and joint publications, including Dispatches from the Cold Seas and Snowscapes, Dreamscapes.

 

 

The Kwakwaka‘wakw, BC, Canada

Theresa Neel is one of the knowledge holders of her Nation and a key ally for Snowchange since 2000. Snowchange, 2002

Theresa Neel is one of the knowledge holders of her Nation and a key ally for Snowchange since 2000. Snowchange, 2002

The Kwakwaka‘wakw are another First Nation whose members are have, from the very early days, participated in the Snowchange community network. To name some of the aspects of the 2010-2016 collaborations, they have included:

  • Field excursions 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2010, 2012
  • Community documentation of traditional knowledge and climate change (Alert Bay) 2002-2006
  • Potlatches 2004, 2010
  • Educational courses and events
Old totem pole close to Alert Bay, Canada. Snowchange, 2004

Old totem pole close to Alert Bay, Canada. Snowchange, 2004

It is noteworthy to mention that the Snowchange logo, ‘Cultural Warming’ has been originally developed for Snowchange by the north Kwakwaka‘wakw / Haisla artist Albert Morrison-Hayward.

 

Tahltan First Nation, BC, Canada

Dempsey Bob is one of the most famous Tahltan artists of the past 100 years. Snowchange, 2004

Dempsey Bob is one of the most famous Tahltan artists of the past 100 years. Snowchange, 2004

The first representatives of the Indigenous peoples of Canada to partner with Snowchange came from the Tahltan First Nation, located in the northern British Columbia. Since those days, the connection has remained strong. This partnership with members of the Tahltan First Nation has included student exchanges, joint publications, field visits, joint seminars and Conferences. The dialogue continues weekly.

Haida First Nation, BC, Canada

Haida Nation has initiated formidable changes and reforms in the northwest coast of British Columbia, BC. They have been and continue to be a respected partner and a friend to Snowchange. The parties have worked on issues of:

  • Haida Knowledge of Climate Change
  • Haida Views on Oil and Gas Development
  • Haida Traditional Knowledge

Snowchange has visited on Haida Gwaii in late 2000, 2001, 2008. Snowchange and Haida participated both in the same events of the World Parks Congress in Australia in November 2014.

Eagle and Crow, 2004.

Eagle and Crow, 2004.

Gwitchin First Nation, NWT, Canada

Gwitchin First Nation is the northernmost in the country, living mostly in the Northwest Territories. First discussions with the Gwitchin on cooperation issues took place in 2000. In 2001 Snowchange visited in Inuvik and met with the Gwitchin representatives on climate change documentation. Extensive work took place in 2002-2004 on documentation of Gwitchin oral histories on climate change. They were released in 2004. Gwitchin First Nation delegation took part in the Snowchange 2002 Conference in Finland and in the 2008 Conference in Aotearoa, NZ. Since 2005, the parties have maintained cooperation on the Gwitchin oral histories. Snowchange has provided video materials of the Gwitchin Elders to the Gwitchin Social and Cultural Institute, located in the community of Tsiigehtchic, NWT, Canada.

Inuiksuit stone statue from Igloolik, Nunavut, Canada. John Macdonald, 2014.

Inuiksuit stone statue from Igloolik, Nunavut, Canada. John Macdonald, 2014.

Inuit and Inuvialuit

Inuit peoples began to work with Snowchange in 2001. In 2002 community documentation of climate change and its impacts spanned both Inuvialuit and Nunavut home regions in Canada. Several Inuvialuit and Nunavut delegates have participated in Snowchange Conferences in 2002, 2003, 2005, 2008. Today, the cooperation continues in the spheres of

  • Collaborative management models
  • Climate change work
  • Indigenous rights (especially with ITK and ICC)
  • Questions of traditional knowledge in the Arctic Council

Boreal Canada

Snowchange has also partnered with several First Nations communities in the boreal zone of Canada. This includes the Wendat, Anishinaabe, KI and other First Nations. Members of these nations participate in the Steering Committee work of Snowchange.