News

A New Work Report on the Finnish Reindeer Pastures Available

Snowchange and the European Forum on Nature Conservation and Pastoralism release a small working report on the Finnish reindeer pastures, especially the Sámi situation. It is available here.

 

 

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Kimmo Pohjonen, Award-winning Finnish Musician to Soundtrack the Jukajoki Film

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The award-winning, internationally-recognized musician Kimmo Pohjonen is arriving next week in Selkie, North Karelia, Finland for talks with the U.S. film crew about creating a soundtrack to the “Jukajoki” film. Footage will be used also in the Our Place on Earth” film to be released in Autumn 2015.

The film(s) highlight and document the award-winning habitat- and tradition- restoring efforts, led by the villages of Selkie and Alavi, to save the heavily-damaged Jukajoki basin. The river has suffered from fish deaths in 2010-2011. The catchment area has been heavily influenced by industrial land use.

Musician Kimmo Pohjonen is nominated for the Nordic Council of Ministers Music Prize 2015 to be given out in the Autumn 2015. He is an accomplished artist, who has been featured in several film soundtracks, fiction films and TV appearances.

Tero Mustonen, head of the village of Selkie, says: “We are delighted to have Kimmo here in the village and to work with him. His music fits real well with the films and we hope that we can reach good common understanding for his participation in the soundtrack work.

The U.S. crew PrettyGoodProductions arrives today on the 18th June to continue with the summer filming of the two documentaries for about two weeks. They are slated to be released in the Autumn 2015. A trailer for the production can be seen in English here.

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The Ecological Restoration Project of River Jukajoki Receives Award in Finland

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The Jukajoki river restoration project has received another award, “Energy Globe Finland 2015″.

The jury reports that “This year’s National Winner of the Energy Globe Award in Finland launched a wetland restoration plan involving local villagers and scientists in order to restore wetlands and stop the fish kill in the river Jukajoki.”

With more than 170 participating countries and over 1500 project submissions annually the Energy Globe Award is today’s most prestigious environmental prize worldwide. It distinguishes projects regionally, nationally and globally that conserve resources such as energy or utilize renewable or emission-free sources. Award ceremonies are held all over the world. Prominent personalities as well as Energy Globe Ambassadors in 90 countries support the mission of Energy Globe. The activities of Energy Globe attract worldwide media attention – international TV stations report each year with approximately 1,000 hours of broadcasting time. The aim of the Energy Globe is to raise global attention on sustainable, everywhere applicable environmental solutions and to motivate people to also become active in this area.

The project has received significant international attention in previous years and has been referred to as a model for boreal catchment area restoration. An US film crew returns to film in the basin in mid-June and in 2014 the UNEP recognized Jukajoki as a best practice. All in all, close to three million euros have been invested on the restoration, research and revitalisation of culture, knowledge and eco-systems in the villages of Selkie and Alavi.

The Jukajoki Prize pages are available here.

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A New Snowchange Science Paper Released

Today Ambio journal released a new Snowchange -related peer-reviewed paper:

Communal visual histories to detect environmental change in northern areas: Examples of emerging North American and Eurasian practices

This article explores the pioneering potential of communal visual-optic histories which are recorded, painted, documented, or otherwise expressed. These materials provide collective meanings of an image or visual material within a specific cultural group. They potentially provide a new method for monitoring and documenting changes to ecosystem health and species distribution, which can effectively inform society and decision makers of Arctic change. These visual histories can be positioned in a continuum that extends from rock art to digital photography. They find their expressions in forms ranging from images to the oral recording of knowledge and operate on a given cultural context. For monitoring efforts in the changing boreal zone and Arctic, a respectful engagement with visual histories can reveal emerging aspects of change. The examples from North America and case studies from Eurasia in this article include Inuit sea ice observations, Yu’pik visual traditions of masks, fish die-offs in a sub-boreal catchment area, permafrost melt in the Siberian tundra and early, first detection of a scarabaeid beetle outbreak, a Southern species in the Skolt Sámi area. The pros and cons of using these histories and their reliability are reviewed.

Paper is here.

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U.S. Media story on the Jukajoki project

Water measurements in Jukajoki area in 2013. Snowchange, 2015

Water measurements in Jukajoki area in 2013. Snowchange, 2015

The Ensia environmental portal is running a story on the Jukajoki restoration project and the associated U.S. documentary film.

It can be read here.

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