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IPCC-Related Report to Collect Indigenous and Local Knowledge: Submissions Extended to End of September

Mountains of Northern Sweden

Mountains of Northern Sweden

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO SEPTEMBER 30th!

As announced in March 2020, the importance and relevance of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge in responding to the challenge of anthropogenic climate change is recognized by policymakers and academics. 

Although the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) acknowledges the importance of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge (IKLK), the inclusion of non-published IKLK remains beyond the scope of the Sixth Assessment Report.

Summer seining in Pirkanmaa, 1900s.

Summer seining in Pirkanmaa, 1900s.

This request for submissions seeks contributions from Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities to the Global Report of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge on Climate Change 2020. We expect that this report will document, among other things, how holders of IKLK observe, forecast and respond to anthropogenic climate change. In doing so, the report will constitute an invaluable input to be considered in the Working Group II contribution to the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report.

OBS! Submissions can be made now at least until 30th September, 2020.

Submission guidelines:

ENGLISH

SPANISH

Chukchi nomads of the Kolyma area, 2010.

Chukchi nomads of the Kolyma area, 2010.

 

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German Newspaper Discusses Snowchange Work

Kissapuro stream, North Karelia.

Kissapuro stream, North Karelia.

Sud-Deutche Zeitung, one of the high quality newspapers in Germany, reviews the role of Indigenous and traditional knowledge in the climate change work and reports on Snowchange work.

This German-language article points several examples from the Arctic, including Alaska, Siberia, Sámi area and northern BC on why Indigenous knowledge matters.

The article is available here.

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Arctic Small Grants Programme 2020

Evenki reindeer herders in a camp in 2006.

Evenki reindeer herders in a camp in 2006.

Land is Life and Snowchange open another season of Arctic Small Grants for 2020. 2019 season produced high quality actions in the North American North. This time all of the Arctic and boreal are open for calls for small grants in the communities.

Land is Life and Snowchange are excited to open a new season of Arctic Small Grants for 2020. Each grant is maximum 5000 USD. On the whole, Indigenous-Led Grantmaking aims to support initiatives that enhance Collective Rights of Indigenous Peoples. More specifically, these are initiatives related to, but not necessarily limited to

Mountains of Northern Sweden

Mountains of Northern Sweden

  • Human Rights
  • Land, Resources and Biodiversity
  • Climate Change
  • Food Sovereignty
  • Women, Youth, Elders
  • Traditional Knowledge, Systems, Practices (including language, arts & sports)
  • Education
  • Economic Empowerment and Strengthening Livelihoods
  • Strengthening Capacity

Who is eligible?

  1. Grassroots Indigenous Organizations: grassroots Indigenous organizations who are continuously working for the collective rights of the Indigenous Peoples, and for the advancement of their self-determination. Priority is given to organizations who have lesser or no access to funding mechanisms.
  2. Indigenous Communities: Certain communities may also receive support upon the endorsement/recommendation of the Regional Coordinator or ally organizations.
  3. Evenki taiga.

    Evenki taiga.

    Indigenous Leaders/Individuals: In particular cases, individuals may also be granted support upon the recommendation of the Regional Coordinator. For example, circumstances where an individual is under political persecution for being a human rights defender; part of the community’s traditional authority; considered as a community change agent.

Please contact Snowchange HQ at contact (at snowchange.org) for applications and info.

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BBC Features Snowchange Rewilding Work in Sámi Area and Australia

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To celebrate Earth Day, BBC has published a large news story on the Indigenous-led climate action. Snowchange work is featured from the Sámi area in Näätämö river catchment and our cooperation with Indigenous Australians.

The Vainosjoki restoration which was completed in 2019 is featured as an example of merging science and Indigenous knowledge for climate resilience. This work has been funded by the Kone Foundation and the Landscape Rewilding Programme and it began in 2013. It is part of the Näätämö river catchment area co-management actions.

Snowchange regional coordinator for Australia Victor Steffensen has been revitalising Indigenous burns and land management in Australia for 20 years. The BBC story highlights the necessity of increasing the Indigenous-led work for improved fire safety and ecosystem functionality. See here for a post regarding Victor’s work.

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Almost a Century of Knowledge Passes: Te Huirangi Eruera Waikerepuru Has Gone Home

Huirangi in December 2008. Photo: Gleb Raygorodetsky, used with permission

Huirangi in December 2008. Photo: Gleb Raygorodetsky, used with permission

Māori Elder, Champion of the language, Orator, Knowledge Holder, Spiritual Person Te Huirangi Eruera Waikerepuru has left his whanau, hapu and iwi in Taranaki, Aoteoroa (New Zealand). Snowchange joins in remembering this one of the most remarkable Indigenous leaders of all time.

Te Huirangi Eruera Waikerepuru was born 1st April, 1929 and died on 8th April 2020. He was 91 years old. Huirangi was trained by a group of Elders early on in the Ohangai region of Taranaki. According to his relatives “Te Huirangi is and has been for many decades an example of what it means to be Māori from Taranaki, always remaining humble and grounded in his ancestral knowledge while staunchly promoting kaupapa Māori (Maori visions, aspirations etc.) and Maori and Indigenous rights on a national and international level.

Huirangi established the Ngā Kaiwhakapūmau i te Reo Māori language training and also coordinated Māori radio in the region from 1988 onwards. Today there are over 20 radio stations around Aoteoroa all thanks to Huirangi’s vision. He worked on every possible avenue of life to advance Māori issues and resurgence.

A detail from the Owae marae. Photo: Gleb Raygorodetsky

A detail from the Owae marae. Photo: Gleb Raygorodetsky

Snowchange connected with Te Huirangi Eruera Waikerepuru and his people through Mahinekura Reinfelds, who passed in 2007. In 2008 Te Huirangi Eruera Waikerepuru and Snowchange organized a large international Conference Snowchange 2008 at the Owae Marae to discuss climate change, community led revitalization, language and other issues where dozens of Arctic and northern Indigenous peoples and Māori exchanged for a week, in December 2008. This led to the Mahinekura Declaration, solar electrification programme of the nomadic camps in NE Siberia, large scale ecological restoration work and permanent work relations between the Māori of Taranaki and Snowchange.

The event transformed many of the Snowchange delegates that received inspiration and life-long commitment for their own work after witnessing the power, knowledge and methods of Te Huirangi Eruera Waikerepuru and his community. We remain ever thankful and join in mourning with his community. Te Huirangi Eruera Waikerepuru was made a Honorary Doctor from the University of Waikato and in 2014 received the Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

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