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Festival of Northern Fishing Traditions Brings Global Small-Scale and Indigenous Fishermen to North

Whitefish roasted. Hannibal Rhoades, used with permission

Whitefish roasted. Hannibal Rhoades, used with permission

Co-organised by Interreg Nord Summer Whitefish and Snowchange Cooperative, the Festival of Northern Fishing Traditions has wrapped up successfully in Tornio, Finland. Over 150 small-scale and Indigenous fishermen around the world joined forces to discuss climate change, traditional knowledge, governance and direct exchanges on common challenges.

Fishtrap out in the Perämeri

Fishtrap out in the Perämeri

As reported by for example Gaia Foundation, Northern Forum and Low Impact Fishermen of Europe the event specifically addressed the need for recognition of traditional ecological

Nuunoq and Vladimir seining in Sevettijärvi. Hannibal Rhoades

Nuunoq and Vladimir seining in Sevettijärvi. Hannibal Rhoades

knowledge and voices of the small-scale and Indigenous fishermen in governance, monitoring and management of fish stocks globally.

Over 20 participants took part in a field trip to Skolt Sámi area, where co-management project leader Pauliina Feodoroff and restoration specialist Janne Raassina guided the guests to the Vainosjoki restoration. Juha, Vladimir and Veikko Feodoroff took

Pauliina Feodoroff outlines the restoration project principles. Hannibal Rhoades

Pauliina Feodoroff outlines the restoration project principles. Hannibal Rhoades

the guests seining for whitefish on lake Sevettijärvi.

Meanwhile in Tornio an EU workshop was under way – CHERISH project brought together eigth EU regions to discuss the cultural heritage of fisheries with field trips out to Perämeri National Park and island of Selkäsarvi. Mats Innala demostrated the push-up fishtraps for whitefish.

Nuunuq from Greenland observes Näätämö river at Skoltfossen. Hannibal Rhoades, used with permission

Nuunuq from Greenland observes Näätämö river at Skoltfossen. Hannibal Rhoades, used with permission

Festival itself contained a seminar day with all regions presenting on friday. On saturday participants went dip netting for whitefish and seining on river Tornio, as can be seen on this video.

Cultural, artenasal and Indigenous fisheries are the lifeline for food security, climate survival and traditional knowledge globally.

Mats Innala with whitefish

Mats Innala with whitefish

The festival sent a strong message that a reform is needed if we are to survive the 21st century challenges faced by these communities. 2020 Festival will continue building on this in Khanty-Mansia, Siberia.

The Festival was made possible by generous support of the participating fishing communities, Snowchange Cooperative,

Juha Feodoroff, a Skolt Sámi fisherman, relaxes during the Festival. Hannibal Rhoades

Juha Feodoroff, a Skolt Sámi fisherman, relaxes during the Festival. Hannibal Rhoades

Gerth, Pavariak and Hugu at Festival.

Gerth, Pavariak and Hugu at Festival.

Interreg Summer Whitefish, CHERISH Interreg Europe, NEFCO, Nordic Council of Ministers, Gaia Foundation, the Northern Forum and many other donors and supporters. Heartfelt thank you to you all!

Whitefish ladders on Kukkolankoski. Hannibal Rhoades

Whitefish ladders on Kukkolankoski. Hannibal Rhoades

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Breakthrough in Solar Panel Summit in Siberia

Training under way in Yakutsk.

Training under way in Yakutsk.

Historic training and cooperation summit in Yakutsk has concluded. The Barefoot trainers, mrs. Fatma and mr. Abin Thomas have successfully delivered a training course for the nomadic Indigenous communities of Lower Kolyma, Sakha-Yakutia. The parties have agreed on future steps of solar panel expansion.

Abin Thomas addresses the summit.

Abin Thomas addresses the summit.

As discussed yesterday on Al-Jazeera and in the Narwhal newspiece in Canada, measures of maintaining Indigenous communities on the land will require new solutions and new innovations this century. The summit and training in Yakutia delivers steps for the nomadic communities to succeed. The College of Northern Peoples and the regional nomadic communities, such as Nennen have agreed to discuss sending delegates to be further trained in Barefoot College in 2019.

Abin training the local delegates.

Abin training the local delegates.

The summit and training workshop was made available through the generous funding of Hogan-Lovells as well as Barefoot College and the Snowchange Cooperative. Delegates are thankful also to Government of Sakha-Yakutia, all nomadic communities and regional authorities as well as Northern Forum Academy.

Nomadic community of Nennen with Abin and Fatma.

Nomadic community of Nennen with Abin and Fatma.

Special gratitude goes out to mr. Chris Madine and mrs. Maria Krivashapkina for maintaining the solar panel coordination and skills in Kolymskaya and the UK in recent years. The results of the summit will be further disseminated in the Lippo 2018 – Festival of Northern Fishing Traditions next week in Tornio, Finland.

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How does indigenous knowledge make sense of the world?: Snowchange on Al-Jazeera

Al-Jazeera features Snowchange on the Stream show. Indigenous communities have for centuries drawn on native scientific knowledge to help them understand the world around them. Known popularly as Traditional Knowledge, this observational evidence is verified by elders and passed on to successive generations, largely as an oral

New spawning areas on Vainosjoki

New spawning areas on Vainosjoki

tradition.

Traditional Knowledge encompasses practices as varied as farming, fishing and medicine. And it gives insight into climate change, which frequently impacts on indigenous communities. In July the Nenets of Siberia joined several Native American tribes in the northwestern United States for the 2018 Canoe Journey, a yearly gathering aimed at fostering inter-tribal community. Researchers taking part in the journey through the Salish Sea gathered water quality data through probes attached to their vessels, enhancing their understanding of how the sea is changing.

Traditional Knowledge is also of great value to Western scientists, with the learning and experience of indigenous communities useful to archaeologists, climatologists, and botanists. In some cases, Traditional Knowledge can help researchers refine or complete historical accounts – and even give Western scientists a brand-new understanding of incidents long ago.

Yet the scientific accounts of indigenous communities are sometimes considered by Western scientists as inferior for not rigidly conforming to Western standards of objectivity and quantifiability. Practitioners of Traditional Knowledge say they often struggle to be taken seriously by scientists working in the Western paradigm. They are concerned that such attitudes could limit opportunities for young indigenous people to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

We’ll meet leading Traditional Knowledge scientists and consider what their approaches have brought indigenous communities and beyond. We’ll also hear about the challenges they face when working alongside Western science professionals.

On this episode of The Stream, we speak with:

Jonathan Waterhouse
Indigenous Peoples Scholar, Portland State University
ohsu-psu-sph.org

Tero Mustonen
Researcher in Indigenous Knowledge and Climate Change
snowchange.org

Samantha Chisholm-Hatfield @drsamzs
Post-Doctoral Research Associate, Northwest Climate Science Adaptation Center

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Historical Solar Energy Summit Under Way in Yakutsk, Siberia

Representatives of the Indigenous communities and regional organisations at the press conference of the summit. Scot Bolsinger, 2018

Representatives of the Indigenous communities and regional organisations at the press conference of the summit. Scot Bolsinger, 2018

A historical solar energy summit to support nomadic Indigenous communities of Sakha-Yakutia, Siberia is under way in the city of Yakutsk. Building on a decade of cooperation between the Barefoot College and Snowchange Co-op the summit will enable discussions of the future of transforming the energy and lightning possibities for nomadic reindeer camps and fish bases.

Nomadic camp on tundra in Kolyma

Nomadic camp on tundra in Kolyma

The pilot stage of the solar electrification was completed between 2007 and 2014. Delegates from the Kolyma communities were trained in India and equipment installed on a range of fish bases and nomadic camps. International monitoring mission led by Chris Madine on behalf of the Arkleton Trust recommended the expansion of the programme after some reformative steps.

Building on support from Hogan-Lovells, Snowchange and Barefoot a new stage of the coooperation is under way. The government of Sakha-Yakutia, Northern Forum Academy and a range of organisations have coordinated the local efforts well.

This summit and workshop will allow the Barefoot experts and trainers and the Indigenous communities as well as the College of the Peoples of the North from Cherskii to outline and plan the next steps for a potential expansion of the programme into the nomadic communities. Scot Bolsinger on consignment from the Hogan-Lovells is on site documenting the efforts under way.

Solar panels provide for nomadic schooling and uses of computers in tundra camps.

Solar panels provide for nomadic schooling and uses of computers in tundra camps.

Kolyma delegates will travel in early September to Finland. The third Festival of Northern Fishing Traditions will collect over 150 Indigenous and traditional fishermen across the world to discuss common community-based solutions and disseminate the potentials of expanding the Barefoot – Snowchange solar panel initiative in the Arctic.

Solar lanterns in use in tents

Solar lanterns in use in tents

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Lippo 2018 will bring over 75 Indigenous and Traditional Fishermen into Finland

Lippo 2018 – Festival of Northern Fishing Traditions  is organized by Snowchange Cooperative. We are co-organising this Festival with the EU – funded Interreg Kesäsiika (Summer Whitefish) project as well as major supporters the Northern Forum, NEFCO, Gaia Foundation and Nordic Council of Ministers. We are very thankful to all participating sponsors and supporters. The Festival will open on the 7th September and last until 9th September, 2018 in Tornio, Finland. A new section on our webpages, “Festivals of Northern Fishing Traditions”, explains the events in detail.Lippo - Festival of Northern Fishing Traditions logo vertical with slogan

Lippo 2018 – Festival of Northern Fishing Traditions will collect over 75 Indigenous and local fishermen around the world to Tornio, Finland over three days of discussions and demonstrations of cultural heritage, climate change, ecological restoration and other issues related to traditional northern fisheries. We welcome delegations from the Indigenous peoples and other delegates of Taiwan, Ainu of Japan, Maori of Aoteoroa – New Zealand, Siberia, Greenland, Alaska, USA, UK, Canadian First Nations, Sámi delegates from Finland, Russia and Sweden as well as Finnish and other fishermen around Europe.

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