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Climate Crisis Advisory Group to be Launched

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Snowchange receives an invitation to a new group of scientists on action on climate. Several of the world’s leading scientists plan to launch an independent expert group this week to advise, warn and criticise global policymakers about the climate and nature crises. Snowchange mandate will be the Arctic, and Indigenous and local community rights and issues.

m2You can see a trailer of the group here. Stream becomes available there on the 24th at 13.00 CET. Additionally, the Guardian discusses the group here.

The new body has been inspired by Independent Sage – the cluster of British scientists who have held UK ministers and civil servants to account for their lack of transparency and mishandling of the Covid pandemic.

The Climate Crisis Advisory Group, comprising 14 experts from 10 nations and every continent, aims to have more of an international reach and provide the global public with regular analysis about efforts to tackle the global heating and biodiversity crises.

Headed by the former UK chief scientific adviser Sir David King, the new group will issue monthly updates about the state of the global environment at meetings that will be open to the media and the public. These online gatherings will be chaired by the BBC presenter Ade Adepitan.

We are hoping that by putting expertise directly into the public domain we are reaching into policymakers’ decision processes, and into the financial sector and how they invest in our future,” King told the Observer. “We are not just going to say ‘this is the state of the global climate’, but also what should the global response be from governments and companies … What we do in the next five years will determine the future of humanity for the next millennium.

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Increasing Inclusion of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge in International Assessment Reports

Winter seining on the island of Seiskari, Eastern Baltic, early 1900s.

Winter seining on the island of Seiskari, Eastern Baltic, early 1900s.

Today an international team of scientists and Indigenous and local community authors releases the “2021 Compendium of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge: Towards Inclusion of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge in Global Reports on Climate Change”

DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.14498.76485

This compendium represents steps towards the inclusion of Indigenous
Knowledge (IK) and local knowledge (LK) into international assessments.
The contributions within this compendium document how holders of IK and
LK observe, project, and respond to anthropogenic climate change. In
doing so, this compendium constitutes an invaluable resource to be
considered in international assessment reports, including the Working
Group II contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
(IPCC) Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) and beyond.

 

A detail from the Owae marae. Photo: Gleb Raygorodetsky

A detail from the Owae marae. Photo: Gleb Raygorodetsky

The need to include IK and LK in understanding climate change impacts, 
developing adaptation and mitigation strategies, and governing climate 
change actions has been called for years. Indeed, in 2011-2012, the IPCC
worked with the United Nations University to create forums where IPCC
Lead Authors and Chairs from the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) met and
interacted directly with Indigenous Peoples and local communities, both
in Mexico and in Australia. These interactions aimed to create, among
other things, opportunities for shared learning and to identify ways to
increase the inclusion of both IK and LK in IPCC assessment reports.

Then, in preparation for AR6, a group of IPCC AR6 WG2 authors met in 
Faro, Portugal in January 2020, and agreed on steps to further increase 
the participation of local communities and Indigenous Peoples, and their 
knowledges, in international assessment reports. Specifically, the AR6

Pauliina Feodoroff, Skolt Saami leader, one of the authors of the report

Pauliina Feodoroff, Skolt Saami leader, one of the authors of the report

authors aimed to mobilise IK and LK contributions in formats that are
“eligible” for inclusion in the IPCC assessment process, capturing
knowledge and evidence from these varied and diverse knowledge holders.
To achieve this goal, a call for contributions for this compendium was
launched. Importantly, the call for contributions prioritized and
privileged the voices and knowledges of Indigenous Peoples and local
communities. As such, this compendium only includes contributions
submitted by Indigenous Peoples and local community knowledge holders,
and includes first-person narratives, oral histories, and other formats.

While this compendium does not solve the challenges and shortcomings 
related to the lack of meaningful inclusion of IK and LK in global 
assessment reports, it is intended to serve as a starting point.

Indeed, shortly after the planning meeting in Portugal, the globe was shocked
and continues to be affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, given
the context of these tumultuous pandemic times, the editors felt that
the 2020 call for submissions to the Indigenous knowledge and local
knowledge compendium can serve as a model and a starting point for
yearly uptake. This open process applies principles of equity,
diversity, and inclusion to develop a rich evidence base covering a
range of voices, statements, and unfiltered and intact knowledge in a
format that can exist and dialogue with the IPCC processes, policies,
and procedures.

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Equity of our future oceans

Sea ice off Iqaluit, Nunavut.

Sea ice off Iqaluit, Nunavut.

A team of Indigenous, local community representative and science authors have teamed to review how the equity of the future oceans might look like. The results are out today, in a new article.

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aspire to a society where ways to improve inclusivity and diversity of equity are actively explored. Here, we examine how equity is considered in a suite of papers that explored possible sustainable futures for the oceans, and mapped out pathways to achieve these futures. Our analysis revealed that a large range of equity issues were recognised and considered, in outcome-based (i.e. distributive), process-based (i.e. procedural) and concept (i.e. contextual) dimensions. However, often, the equity problem was not explicitly stated.

Rather it was implied through the action pathway identified to move towards a more sustainable future, highlighting that reducing inequity is interlinked with improving sustainability. Based on these findings, we reflect on the way equity is conceptualised and considered within this work as well as futures science for the oceans more broadly. A key lesson learnt is that science and knowledge production are immediate areas where we can work to improve equity.

We can build capacity to understand and include equity issues. We can develop mechanisms to be more inclusive and diverse. We can also critically reflect on our own practices to fundamentally challenge how we work and think in the space of marine science research.

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Grey Plover Visits, Several New Rewilding Sites

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Late May saw the visit of Grey Plover (Pluvialis squatarola) in Linnunsuo ICCA rewilding wetland. Most likely the rare bird was on its way to the Russian North. Additionally, May saw the inclusion of over 220 hectares to the rewilding sites in Finland.

Korteaapa

Korteaapa

Several new rewilding sites have been added to the programme in May 2021, with the Landscape Rewilding Programme expanded over 221 hectares. The following sites were added:

  • Kivisuo Paanakka OGF forests expanded the Kivisuo peatland complex with over 40 hectares
  • Korteaapa peatland in Kemijärvi, in Arctic Circle, joined the programme, totaling 55 hectares
  • Matosuo in Soini, Western Finland, 36 hectares is a primary winter habitat for the forest deer
  • Louhineva fen, 90 hectares, is a significant turn for the lake Kuivasjärvi catchment and a home of 2-3 nesting pairs of the southernmost ptarmigan in Finland.
Paanakka aerial view.

Paanakka aerial view.

 

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Ethical and Inclusive Communication On Small-Scale Fisheries

SCB Marine comms webinar

Join us in a webinar on Ethical and Inclusive Communication On Small-Scale Fisheries, Wednesday 19th May, 2021.

See below for instructions on registering and instructions here.

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