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A new science paper on community based monitoring

Nutendli reindeer herders and Snowchange staff greet the morning sun, 2006. Photo: Snowchange, 2014

Nutendli reindeer herders and Snowchange staff greet the morning sun, 2006. Photo: Snowchange, 2014

Snowchange and collaborators release a new science paper on community based monitoring, titled: “The Contributions of Community-Based Monitoring and Traditional Knowledge to Arctic Observing Networks: Reflections on the State of the Field“, published in the Arctic journal.

The paper is available here.

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Snowchange and the UN Association Release a Joint Photo Exhibit on Skolt Sámi Work

Skolt Sámi fishermen Jouko Moshnikoff and Teijo Feodoroff at winter nets in Spring 2014. Photo: Gleb Raygorodetsky, 2015.

Skolt Sámi fishermen Jouko Moshnikoff and Teijo Feodoroff at winter nets in Spring 2014. Photo: Gleb Raygorodetsky, 2015.

Snowchange, together with all community and project partners, teams again with the UN Association of Finland to release a set of high-quality English-language posters about the first collaborative management project in Finland, the Näätämö River Co-Management Plan. 

The posters with the photos will be on exhibit at the Sámi Museum of Siida from 22nd January to 27th January, 2015, after which they will be displayed in various cities across Europe. The set of posters is devoted to the life work of mr. Leif Rantala.

The posters are available here as PDFs.

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Snowchange Mourns the Loss of a Prominent Scholar Of Eastern Sámi – Leif Rantala

Eastern Sámi family camp in Seitsul Island, Kola Peninsula, in late 1800s. Photo: Courtesy of the Snowchange Co-op, 2014

Eastern Sámi family camp in Seitsul Island, Kola Peninsula, in late 1800s. Photo: Courtesy of the Snowchange Co-op, 2014

Snowchange Cooperative joins in mourning for the loss of a prominent scholar of the Eastern Sámi languages, cultures and regions – mr. Leif Rantala.

Mr. Rantala was a long-time Lecturer of Sámi languages at the University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland. He worked across decades in various positions in the Sámi world, including essential contributions to the work of the Sámi Council. He is the author of numerous works and publications on the Eastern Sámi issues.

Snowchange worked with mr. Rantala since 2010 on the mapping efforts of the Eastern Sámi space. The cooperation, amongst other things, resulted in the award-winning Eastern Sámi Atlas, released in 2011 and re-released in 2013. Since 2010, Snowchange continued to work with mr. Rantala weekly until the time of his death. He passed away at 67.

Original announcement of the passing of mr. Rantala is available in Finnish here.

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New Snowchange Discussion Paper Published from Nunavut, Canada

Inuiksuit stone statue from Igloolik, Nunavut, Canada. John Macdonald, 2014.

Inuiksuit stone statue from Igloolik, Nunavut, Canada. John Macdonald, 2014.

“So Near, So Far” is a recent paper by long-time collaborator of Snowchange, John Macdonald from Canada. Mr. Macdonald, together with the local Inuit Elders of Igloolik, has been working with the Igloolik Oral History Project since 1980s. With publication of this paper we celebrate the 30th anniversary of the project.

“So Near, So Far” is the most recent installment in the Snowchange Discussion Papers: 

Canada’s Arctic policies of the late 1950 caused Inuit across the Arctic to move from their traditional encampments on the land into permanent settlements established by government. Measured in geographical distance the move was negligible, but in terms of social and cultural displacement its consequences would be considerable and irreversible. The government-sponsored settlements soon isolated Inuit from their traditional life-style, while the relative autonomy they had enjoyed on the land was unwittingly surrendered to benevolent government agencies. In the settlement of Igloolik, Nunavut, Inuit elders, recognizing the extent to which the transition from the land to an urban setting had eroded their culture, language and traditions, established, in 1985, a community-based project to record and document the memories and experiences of their former life on the land. This initiative, still on-going, is known as the Igloolik Oral History Project. The paper describes the inception, development, and outcomes of the Project over the past thirty years, as a means to preserving Inuit cultural heritage in the face of rapid social change.

Paper is available here.

Merry Xmas and Happy New Year from Snowchange!

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Grammy-award winning music group Tinariwen supports Snowchange in forest struggle

During a recent performance, the Grammy-award winning music group Tinariwen came out supporting Snowchange and the forest struggles in Finland. 

Snowchange is grateful for this growing international support and awaits further dialogue with Metsähallitus on the issues this week. (thanks to Sarah Fortune from the Tinariwen camp for the news!)

Photo: Sarah Fortune

Photo: Sarah Fortune

 

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