News

Ethics of Comanagement?

pinkA new science paper from Snowchange, out today, investigates Indigenous ethics and co-management. It is published in the American Journal of Evaluation.

The applicability of Indigenous ethics to the evaluation of ecological restoration is explored through two case examples involving the Indigenous Sámi rivers of Näätämö and Ponoi in the European North.

Six key restoration approaches are described that would have been overlooked had it not been for the use of Indigenous ethics from the start of the work. The detection of rapidly proceeding climate change impacts and species range shifts, algae blooms, documentation of gendered coastal lifestyles, and ultimately the ecological restoration of salmonid habitats were recognized as critical markers of success when these approaches were practiced, lived and cherished by all members of the cogovernance community.

This article asks critical questions about the role of Indigenous knowledge and rights within comanagement and environmental evaluations and makes the case for land-based lifestyles as vehicles for maintaining distinct, culturally relevant ethics processes.

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Honourable Thomas R. Berger Passes On

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Close ally and a friend of Snowchange, preeminent lawyer, former B.C. Supreme Court Justice and UNBC honorary Doctor of Laws recipient the Honourable Thomas R. Berger has died. A science paper based on the interviews with Justice Berger was published in 2019.

Berger’s parents both lived in northern British Columbia. As a young lawyer, Berger came to prominence in the 1970s representing the Nisga’a Nation at the Supreme Court of Canada in the Calder case. Decided in 1973, it first established the existence of Indigenous title and set in motion the modern treaty process in Canada. The case eventually led to the Nisga’a treaty signed in 2000.

Pacific Salmon, 2004

Pacific Salmon, 2004

Later in the 1970s, Berger became the youngest judge appointed to B.C.’s Supreme Court in the 20th century. He served as a Justice of the Supreme Court of B.C. from 1971 – 1983. During that time, he was the sole Royal Commissioner of the historic Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry between 1974 and 1977.

From 1983 to 1985, he was chair of the Alaska Native Review Commission. In 1991 – 1992 he served as deputy chair of the World Bank’s Sardar Sarovar Commission in India. In 2013, he was counsel for the Manitoba Métis in the successful appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada for recognition of the promises of land for the Métis made in 1870.

Berger also served as Member of Parliament and Member of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia in the 1960s. He was the leader of the leader of the B.C. New Democratic Party in 1969. An Officer of the Order of Canada and a Member of the Order of British Columbia, Berger will be remembered for his commitment to human rights.

In 2017, he was the guest speaker at the Wilp Wilxo’oskwhl Nisga’a Institute graduation celebration in Gitwinksihlkw. He met with all the graduates, many of whom had relatives who worked with Berger during the Calder case proceedings. He received an honorary degree from UNBC in 2018. (text summarized in part from UNBC).

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Who Is the Ocean?

Coasts of Taranaki

Coasts of Taranaki

Out today, a new science paper co-authored with several Indigenous and marine communities, asks the profound question – Who is the Ocean?

On the 20th March 2017 the New Zealand government enshrined into law that the Whanganui River is a legal entity, having rights and responsibilities just as a human person. This was perceived as a massive victory for Maori in getting their understanding of the river recognized in a contemporary Common Law system, and points to the central question —who is the Ocean from Indigenous and traditional viewpoints? It points to acknowledgement of the Maori worldview for not just the rivers but the Ocean and all life on Earth.

The article features answers and voices from

  • Unaklakleet, Alaska
  • Kvarken, Finland
  • Greenland
  • Haida Gwaii, Canad
  • Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa
  • Indigenous territories of Taiwan
  • Indigenous Australia
  • Aoteoroa
  • Kawawana, Senegal

 

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Rewilding PodCasts for April

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Hogan-Lovells, one of the sponsors of the Landscape Rewilding Programme, has opened a set of high-end podcasts for public.

Please listen here.

Näkymä Kivisuolta

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Planet Progress with Dr. Hannah Fry

GoldCrest. Wikipedia, used with permission, 2020.

GoldCrest. Wikipedia, used with permission, 2020.

Associated with the recent Google.org grant, Planet Progress has released a podcast where Snowchange rewilding work is discussed with Dr. Hannah Fry from the UK.

Listen to the podcast here.

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